To tatou Ipukarea, to tatou rau maire

hrough the Project ENUA GEF7 and the National Environment Service as the implementing agency the day was celebrated appreciating our environment at the Takuvaine Catchment Area. This event helped to raise awareness and foster appreciation for this crucial eco-system.
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Earlier this month, NES celebrated International Environment Day at the Takuvaine Water Catchment.

The NES were joined by some key stakeholder including Ministry of Education, Infrastructure Cook Islands, Cook Islands Tourism, Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Marine Resources, Cook Islands Climate Change, and Non-Governmental Organisation’s, Te Ipukarea Society and Muri Environment Care, Landowners and the Aronga Mana to name a few.

International Environment Day is celebrated annually, and this years’ theme is “Our land, our Future” – To Tatou Ipukarea, To tatou rau Maire.

Through the Project ENUA GEF7 and the National Environment Service as the implementing agency the day was celebrated appreciating our environment at the Takuvaine Catchment Area. This event helped to raise awareness and foster appreciation for this crucial eco-system. The program focused on the importance of the Water Catchments, the surrounding wetlands and valuable ecosystems that exist.

Several speakers were invited to make presentations on the role they play in the environment, these included Landowner & Takuvaine Catchment Management Committee member Celine Dyer who welcomed the visitors to the catchment area and opened her Organic Plantation for the event and visit. Entomologist Mike Bowie from the Ministry of Agriculture spoke about “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly Bugs” Lydia Sijp from the Project Enua team presented on the importance of the Cloud Forest, water catchments, wetlands and their role in ecosystem health.

The program at the Takuvaine Catchment concluded with vetiver grass planting donated by Muri Environment Care. The vetiver was planted along a steep bank to prevent and reduce the impact of soil erosion. There was also a special planting of the Pua (Fagraea berteroana) known for its medicinal significance.

The work is just the beginning. In the coming months, a survey will be conducted as part of the GEF7 Project on four catchments:  Avatiu, Takuvaine, Avana and Turangi to develop a management plan.

The National Environment Service would like to thank those who joined us in celebrating International Environment Day.

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About Nes

The National Environment Service is established to protect, conserve and ensure the Cook Islands environment is managed sustainably. The agency is headed by a Director with delegated powers to carry out the functions of the Environment Act 2003.

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